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hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capitol hill itself, until all of the residents of the very seat of our
twain. would come from? before he came to nevada territory he worked on the mississippi, and he became a steamboat captain. and the term mark twain is two fathoms, deep. it was from the water, the draft of a steamboat and they would say, mark twain. welcome he liked that apparently came you. this is the story that is generally accepted. there's another story about him having a tab at the bar and if you ask me, mark twain, mark two, put that on my tab. i think the generally accepted point of view from scholars is mark twain from being a steamboat captain. so here he is, writing for the enterprise, first time he put mark twain. it's published february 3. from then on, he is mark twain. and is stock would grow as his stores would be picked a. a newspaper in aurora woodpecker that the a newspaper in sacramento would pick it up to newspaper in san francisco. mostly in the western united states through the use of the telegraph. and very funny, although he says some things that they don't know if it's the truth or not. are the hoaxes? he has one story about a family, not far from carson city
separation of the mississippi river basin from the great lakes, hoping against hope to stop the advance of one very aggressive fish, a fish that is just one part of a far bigger problem. our cover story is reported now by mark strassman. >> reporter: meet the king of the illinois river. >> wow. reporter: and a big show-off. mask lar. ... muscular. very muscular. >> reporter: i mean, this thing will hurt you. >> yes, yes. it can jump out of the water at high speeds. they can jump a great distance out of the water, up to eight feet out of the water. >> reporter: fast, easy to startle, and voracious eaters, asian silver carp are a jarring sight here and a hit on youtube tube. but fisheries research scientist greg sass says in the long history of this water way what's also remarkable is when this fish got here. just 20 years ago. >> by the mid 2000's it was becoming a crisis. not only were fish jumping everywhere but what was showing up in our catches, the amount of asian carp versus the native fishes. >> reporter: just amazing how wide it is. with no natural predators in this stretch of th
songs. ?let freedom ring." from stone mountain of georgia, and every hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capi
down the mississippi filled with bales of hay for grant's horses. the barge set out at night, so the confederates wouldn't see it. but, unfortunately, it was a night with a full moon, and it was really quite visible, and the confederates fired cannons at it. one of the shells hit the barge, exploded, killed about a dozen union soldiers, set the hay on fire, and junius and albert jumped into the river and attempted to float away. but the confederates sut boats and captu th and imprisoned them in various prisons for the next 20 months. and then they escaped from a prison in salisbury, north carolina, and with the help of slaves and pro-union bush whackers walked 300 miles over the appalachians to the union lines. so i read this, which was only about as long as what i've just said, and i thought to myself, wow, that would make a great movie. unfortunately, i don't make movies. but occasionally i do write books. so i thought, well, should i write a book about these guys? i suppose if i was a novelist, that little synopsis would have been enough, and i just could have made up the rest
to the united states in 1848. he found that living on the mississippi was not quite the life that mark twain for trade in his book. together the dangberg brothers went to work together in a flour mill and then they moved to illinois where they were, from for threeyein 1853 hearing on tt stories about the gold rush and california, they decided to make the move west. they did this by buying 200 head of livestock and driving them from st. louis to california. it turns out that could be a very profitable venture. because even back then things are more expensive in california than they were in st. louis. you could buy a cow or an ox for five or $10 in st. louis. same animal would cost $50 or more in california. it was a profitable trip for them. they arrived in dayton, nevada, in 1853, they immediately went to work panning for gold in the carson river the next day. they did this for about three years, operating with mixed results. some days were exhausting, some is not so much. he did that for three winters. one of the letters that we recovered, he said that he gave up gold-mining because there w
antecedence in the first black boy who was assassinated in mississippi in 1955 for allegedly violating racial adequate and speaking to a white woman. her body was placed in the tallahassee river with the 25 -- nugent. it was shown in jet magazine and that spurred the nation to look at the price of white supremacy on our democracy. when you think about 1963, 1963 is the year of birmingham and the year dr. king writes his famous letter from a birmingham jail and in that letter dr. king said the activism going on in birmingham and the young women and men being arrested sometimes as young as 8, 9, 10 years old are taking this nation back to those great wells of democracy dug deep by the founding fathers. king was being kind because the country was founded on racial slavery. a conversation that we still have not had but 50 years ago with the march on washington provided, a litmus test for american democracy. when canes speaks at the march on washington on august 28, 1963, he says americans of all colors and all races are going to have to struggle together, go to jail together to try to fundamental
the mississippi. >> sort of. >> rose: to memphis, or somewhere. >> well, i can't explain it. this is just music that touched me from the very first moment i heard it. i was very, very young, and i believe it was a willy dixon record, but i'm not sure. but i heard this sound, this sort of wonderful sliver of light broke through between a minor third and a major third-- and i later investigated what that actually means. i didn't even know it at the time. and i just-- it made me shiver. it was almost like an electric shock. and i realized this is where i wanted to live. i wanted to be in that space and hear these sounds and these stories knowing, of course, that i'm monumentally unsuited for the task. you know, i'm not from here. this is not my music. >> rose: before we talk about "house," where did you grow up? >> i grew up in ox horde, england, home of the blues-- it's not the home of the blues. ( laughs (. >> rose: maybe oxford, mississippi. >> yes, i grew up in oxford. >> rose: your dad was-- >> he was a doctor. >> rose: your moment? >> she was-- she raised four children. >> rose: of which you
a burn in mississippi. people are not being hung in mississippi any more. there's racism there, no doubt. there's racism in boston. when you went through those periods, i went through them in boston, i was amazed how much the white community were really outraged in boston. but let's keep in mind the tenor of the times you're born in. these kids today are not born at a time when there's racial tension. >> still, the leader of the senate. >> i understand that. >> president obama noted in his remarks when he made in the white house press briefing room at the end of the trayvon martin trial, or the george zimmerman trial, about the killing of trayvon martin, he said his daughters, sasha and malia don't talk this way. we learn from previous experiences. what i think is concerning is how exacerbated the administration makes these. partly because we pay attention to what they say, we're looking for any signal, we want the president to bring us together and it actually hasn't happened. maybe that's the fault of those who would oppose him on his policies. somehow i don't -- i actually can't get m
. in wasn't mississippi. it was not too-- it was a different kind of state. this is punitive. it's vindictive. it's vengeful. it's just a way-- there is no evidence of any voter fraud of anybody using somebody else's identification to vote. if there were, you could say it's an over-reaction. this is a created fabrication to basically discourage, if not make impossible, voting by groups, people who belong to groups who don't ordinarily vote republican, who vote democratic. 56% of the people in north carolina voted on election day. early voting rather. there will be no early voting. it's just an attempt to make it difficult to vote. >> i guess i sort of agree. i would say two things. first, one of the great stories in american history and in the south in the last couple of years, couple of decades, is the gradual empowerment and franchisement of african americans. i think one's basic attitude is you don't want to be on the wrong side of that story. so i do think if you're supporting this, you're putting yourself on the wrong side of that story. having said that, do i think it's a h
shelton was up for it. this was a guy who was born in mississippi. he grew up on a farm in a cotton. he had a lot of different jobs through his life. he was tough as nails and he joined the military when he was 18 years old. he joined as a private and went to korea and saw action right away. he was wounded three times, won the silver star. he came back and decided i love the military. i'm going to make this my career. the only time he left the military was back just before you got married. he decided he was going to try farming again. the military had a policy that you can leave the military for 90 days and returned -- if you return within 90 days you would get your previous rank but after 90 days you have to go back to being a private and at the time he was a sergeant. on the 87th day he returned because farming in mississippi was just too hard and love to the army life and he missed it. so, he decided since he was going to make it a career he was going to do more than learn as much as he possibly could. so at 28 years old to cut off age for becoming an officer, he applied for officer
to go back. all of that plus breaking news. there was a miracle today in oxford, mississippi. reinforced with scratch- resistant glass and a unibody made kevlar strong. okay google now. call my droid. the new droid ultra by motorola. when strength matters, droid does. ♪ the joint is jumpin' osteo bi-flex® helps strengthen your joints.° like calcium supplements can help your bones, osteo bi-flex can help your joints.° osteo bi-flex... the best stuff in the joint.™ now in joint and muscle formula. >> shepard: u.s. senator ted cruz says nothing against canada but is he an american. he was indeed born in canada but his mother is a u.s. citizen. he says he actually has dual citizenship both countries. now he plans to give up the canadian citizenship. senator cruz recently won a straw poll of 2016 conservative denver. made two trips to iowa. home of the nation's first in the nation presidential contest and staffers say this week is he planning to visit new hampshire. the first primary state san diego mayor bob filner is trying to settle a sexual harassment lawsuit against him from the c
on the death list in mississippi and he took it upon himself to train our children what to do in case they heard gunfire. that's exactly what they did that night. each other helped each other to the bathroom to get in the tub and my screams stopped them from completing that hiding point. but we knew, you live with death threats constantly and you adapt your life to that. you might argue, but you don't leave without the embrace. you might become angry with things that are happening around you, but it's a time of support. it's a time of pulling people together. and during that time, we had the ages divided. there were the young people and there were the older people. those in the middle were more or less teachers who were a little afraid to speak up and stand out. medgarr stood alone in that battle. he did have supporters, of course, but he was the point person and it was extremely difficult for us as a family to live with that. but you lived as though every day was going to be your last together. it sounds a little sad but that's the way it was. >> one of your themes in your speech on
secretary of the naacp in mississippi, civil rights leader medgar evers organized voter registration efforts. evers was assassinated in 1963 mere months before the march on washington. since then as a civil rights activist and former executive director of the naacp, his widow myrlie evers williams has carried on his legacy. she joins me sitting rights here, along with joy reid, manager the grio and msnbc contributor. i have been chasing after you, joy. i see you everywhere but here. now i've got you here finally. you are very smart about this stuff. and i know you're from the younger generation. i want to get myrlie on this too. i want you to react to this. a couple of things. it's not just minority voters that benefit from traditional voting patterns. the easier way to vote, younger people have a harder time budgeting their time. they just do for whatever reason. the easier it is to vote, the more are going to vote. african-american voters, many don't have money to have a car, don't have a driver's license, may be older living in row houses like i used to live as a kid, and they basically h
, in the delta of mississippi. >> and there was a line about marching through the south like sherman which had to be exercised before you delivered, isn't that right? >> it is true that i did have a line in the speech that said in effect if we do not see meaningful progress here today, the day will come, when we will not confine our marching in washington. but we may be forced to march through the south the way sherman did nonviolently. the archbishop of washington -- if i did not delete that part of the speech. and we had some discussion the evening before the march. and later someone came to me and said how is your speech and i said, we have to make some changes you have to delete something. and i remember having a discussion with mr. wilkins and i said roy, this is my speech. and i'm speaking for the young people. speaking people fresh from jails. and he sort of dropped it. and randolph and martin luther king, jr. came to me. and we met right on the side of mr. lincoln. the music was already playing. someone had a portable;÷ñ÷ typewriter. and dr. king said to me, john that doesn't sound
office is located in jackson mississippi. i have been with a head start since 1988 and i am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration . >> i'm the associate director for education income maintenance of labor, part of the executive office of the president. we oversee the budgets of a number of federal agencies including education and the administration for children family. >> and the director of policy and planning. i started my 20 years ago. i'm really happy to be it today. >> was president budgets, policy, and economic cover tentative. i worked for secretary sibila is set the department of health and human services. >> i'm the managing director for economic policy here at the center for american progress. deficits and debt. >> was wondering if we could start with you. we heard numbers mentioned in the introduction. i wonder he might drill down on the more. the office has some additional information. maybe even what we might be seeing if sequestration continues. >> let me start. our topline numbers of children now. that's about 6,000 infants and todd
in mississippi. >> guyot: people talked about his being from mississippi, being poor. >> his mother was a teenaged bride. they picked cotton, they worked the land. that's a hard living. >> barry: and i grew up dirt, dirt, dirt, dirt poor. did all kind of odd jobs, you know, hustling pop bottles. back in the day you could get old rags and sell them too. >> guyot: people talked about his lifting himself up by his bootstraps and... >> reporter: you were an eagle scout, you were a member of the national honor society, you played varsity basketball, you received a masters in chemistry, you were on your way to a doctorate and then you shifted gears. >> barry: i think that movement was the catalyst and the lightning rod for the country, and i'm proud to have been a part of it. >> guyot: his civil rights work resonated with people that a lot of other things wouldn't have resonated with. >> johnson: he had instant credibility. as well he should have. >> effi: i don't know if i should say it, but we were living together, i said, "well, what are we going to do? i mean, you know, you can't be l
, mississippi. and many may relate to that. the death of those three civil rights workers there. but you also relate the fact that there was many others all across the great state of mississippi and in other southern states who sacrificed as well. and so share some of your opinions on the ideal of galvanizing the college youth. >> we followed the tradition as college students of young people and college students all over the world. when you talk about changing the social order, it is usually the young people, the young, educated people who will generally spear that particular change. -- spearhead that particular change. so we followed that same historical tradition. when, we know about the three civil rights workers who were murdered, but during that same period from june, i think, through september a total of 7 other blacks -- 27 other blacks, young black males, were murdered in mississippi. i related the you the story of two students at alcorn college who were just coming back to the campus from downtown, and two carloads of klansmen kidnapped them, and they found be their bodies, i think,
in the country to handle cases in mississippi and alabama and california and all over and tom was one of those people. he was sent to texas to handle a very significant hate crime case when he was a young lawyer that involved a gang of white supremacists that went on a killing spree and ended up shooting 3 people and killing one when he was a young lawyer working in the civil rights division. he later served as a top deputy for attorney general janet reno, he was special counsel to ted kennedy and served as the president's advisor on civil rights issues. he was also director for civil rights at the department of human health services. tom, you will find, is passion ate and committed to equality and justice for everyone. tom, more than anyone i know, makes every single day in his life matter, whether it's focused on anti-bullying work, voting rights, disability rights, housing rights, the eighth amendment, immigration, hate crimes or human trafficking. tom cares about all of those issues to his core and he works every day to make the world a better place. ladies and gentlemen, please welc
senator from mississippi joins us. we will see you tomorrow night. night. good night from new york. ♪ ...and ev stop itself if it has to. the technology may be hard to imagine... but why you wod want it isot. ♪ the 2014 e-clas it doesn't just see the fure, it is the future. neil: and here you were worried about them collecting your phone records. tens of the nsa has been collecting more than that. forget about every color we make. try every e-mail we right, every chat room in which we have a chance. what we type, where we browsed, how long we have been browsing, everything we point and click catalog to by an agency his abuses are pathetic and sick. here is what is even more alarming. they're still doing it. they are doing more of it. slocum, everybody. i'm neil cavuto, and it is enough to make even james bond blush.
of the mississippi river, but the southeast is getting too much rain. lhat will mean higher food bills, and here's manuel bojorquz. >> can rained again in cordell, georgia, they call themselves the water capital of the world. dell,renshaw has grown them here for 30 years. >> it's the wettest year i've seen. >> reporter: rainfall totals in many parts of the southeast are nchenches above normal. produce that grows close to the neound or on vines have been heavily damaged. waterlogged melons here, split open, rot or lose flavor. law you can tell? >> you see is that brown around the edge of it? that water just running off? >> reporter: half of crenshaw's crop is ruined. se thinks he's facing $1 million n losses. in a drought, you can irrigate. >> right. ut weporter: but when you have this much rain what, can you do? >> there's nothing you can do. you can't take the water away. >> reporter: the melons that aren't any good end up at packing houses like the ones thed by danny wilcher. july is supposed to be peak season. r. we shut down for two weeks. >> reporter: and that hasn't happened in how long? >
the opportunity to stand on the deck of a new bridge over the mississippi river, 16 feet board to go. i could watch this go down the nations greatest river. theas an awesome view. people that we serve know that we need to build the next great bridges and maintain the futures that all americans drive on. we're tremendously honored. we want to hear from our first guest here, congressman bill shuster. he oversees house action on all the transportation including maritime, highway, mass transit, and railroad. obeying hiss is ninth congressional district and has searched on the committee since his first election to congress in 2000 one. welcome. >> thank you very much. great examplet that i can take back to washington as to how the parties can work together. we need a good example. i really appreciate the opportunity to be here. at every state i have been to this is my first visit to wisconsin. penn state is going to prevail this year. i look at a couple of other governors. thosek forward to engagements. it is an opportunity for me to engage with governors. have traveled around the country, seeing
. because of that there are still flash flood warnings and regular warnings up and down the mississippi river because of the potential for more flooding. also the threat of severe storms from southeastern montana into parts of kansas where we could end up with large hail and damaging winds. a few tornadoes are possible but they should be brief. this is most likely later this afternoon and into this evening. the plains really do not need anymore rain right now. >> absolutely. it could be a busy weather day. >>> straight ahead, the fbi let informants commit over 5600 crimes. powerball is over $400 million. >>> a frightening report of what dirty car sellers are doing that only a trusted mechanic can save you from. "first look" is back in three. right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. h
flight delays. we do have flash flood watches and warnings up and down the mississippi river because of the additional rain that we'll also get today. we also have the threat of stronger storms like this afternoon into this evening. just to the east of the rockies into the western plains, biggest threat would be for damaging wind gusts and also for some small hail possible, isolated tornadoes are a possibility but not really a huge threat. temperatures today, really hot down south, well above 100 degrees. cool up north, especially in and around the great lakes region. tomorrow back into the mid 80s. 90s in kansas city. scattered showers and storms will spread into the east as we go into tomorrow. temperatures in the northeast will stay cool and comfortable for one more day. that heat will also spread eastward as we go into tomorrow. brian. >> dylan, thank you very much. going to sports stories, tiger woods looks pretty good going into the final major of the season. still number one in the world. don't forget that. he virtually lapped the field. it was kind of a joke. he took a seven-
-year-old james jefferson was born in mississippi and raised in san francisco. but the february attack he describes sounds like something from the days in the deep south. >> it's not a kind of thing that i would think happened in san francisco. >> he was saying you're an n, you're an n. you're just an n. >> reporter: 47-year-old david wright repeatedly used the n word as he shoved the retired clerk into the gutter of this convenience store. >> i looked at him and i said i'm a bike cop andly [ bleep ] your face in. >> reporter: but he is not a cop and officers found the gloves in wright's own bag. >> we have a case the tenant is in dispute. the tenant is african american. the landlord left a noose which is obviously offensive. >> i have a problem with white people passing me by on the streets now. >> reporter: the fbi reported 3,465 racially motivated crimes. ktvu channel 2 news. >>> arizona based rural metro corporation says it has come with an agreement with its lenders. the filing will not only reduce its debt but further improve patient care. >>> more than half of adults that go on
continues in the south with temperatures near or above 100 degrees from texas to mississippi. and the atlantic coast will see its share of wet weather. >>> in sports, the los angeles angels just can't seem to solve the texas rangers. in the first inning the angels tie the game at 2-2 on back-to-back homers, but in the eighth, rangers' third baseman adrian beltre slaps an rbi single to right field to break a 3-3 tie. texas adds four runs in the ninth for an 8-3 win. >>> and some gnatty finance between nl east rivals washington and atlanta. bryce harper gives the nationals a 1-0 lead when he homers to center field. the next time bryce harper comes to the plate, he's hit by a pitch and tempers flair as he heads toward first base. while the benches were cleared, no punches were thrown, no one was ejected. the braves win, 2-1, their 12th straight victory. >>> and, finally, it's hard enough to bowl a perfect game, but the way one bowler lost his bid for a 300 was heartbreaking. >> looking for perfection, 300. come on, ball. oh, my god. >> oh, no. >> holy cow. did you see that? >> o
en dÍas anteriores, chubascos y tormentas abarcando a mississippi, alabama, georgia, y la florida, y temperaturas cÁlidas que continuaran en toda la zona, por mÁs de 90 grados, incluyendo todo el estado de la florida, bueno, tiempo seco estuvo en el sur de la florida, y viene lluvia, ustedes que nos ven en miami, desde el jueves, una onda tropical que hay q vigilar. >>> potencial de desarrollo tropical, en el noreste, esperando alivio, bueno, tuvimos mucha lluvia hoy en el corredor de la i 95, pasa y frente, maÑana 78, muchos sectores comenzarÁ el dÍa con 49, 53 grados, en la tarde, se queda con 78, condiciones agradables para gran parte del noreste, y agradable en zona de grandes lagos, pasÓ el sistema frontal, hace cuestiÓn de 24 horas , en el noroeste una tremenda baja que dejarÁ nublados, y lluvias en el noroeste del paÍs, incluyendo san francisco, mucha niebla, y nubes bajas, los Ángeles, 82, tiempo seco, la y la repÚblica mexicana con mucho calor, en el norte, con 39, y algunos puntos, chihuahua, coahuila 40 grados. y la penÍnsula de yucatÁn con lluvias desde el ju
georgia and areas of mississippi and alabama, too, especially the southern portions near the gulf as much as six to ten inches of rain over the next couple of days. by far the southeast is a travel trouble spot in the northeast if you left the windows open last night you may have had to close them in the middle of the night. we're in the mid-50s in the city, 40s in some of the suburbs. feels like fall but it will be a beautiful afternoon, thomas, we showed you d.c. there, i mean, you do vacations in d.c. mid-august, you're prepared for like heat, humidity, gross. 80 and low humidity enjoy it. >> i grew up in baltimore so i know all about gross, i do. bill thanks so much. >>> coming up at the top of the hour on "morning joe" we'll take you live to egypt as the military continues its crackdown on the muslim brotherhood protest. we'll discuss the options that remain for u.s. action. >>> and then we come back we huddle around the water cooler, a new tactic in the push to get san diego mayor bob filner out of office, the parcy video that you need to see and hear after this. right now, 7 years
nuclear plant on the mississippi river in louisiana. barbed wire fencing, roaming s.w.a.t. teams, double-sealed doors and hardened concrete protect the nuclear core and the pool that holds spent fuel rods. but because the nation's plants are at least 30 years old, often with communities nearby, experts say hardening them to 20 century standards would be both costly and challenging. nationwide, 65 of 100 working reactors sit within close proximity to population centers, one in three americans lives within 50 miles of a nuclear reactor, including new york, boston, philly, charlotte, chicago, miami, baton rouge, and san diego. 50 miles is considered the potential contamination zone. today the nuclear regulatory commission insisted it has strengthened security requirements for commercial nuclear power plants and remains confident that these important facilities are adequately protected. while reactors may remain a target, any new security requirements are now highly unlikely. tom costello, nbc news, washington. >>> the stock market got pummeled today, the worst day's drop in eight weeks, tri
lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s, you know, who lived there? well, as i was driving, you looked closer, there was puffs of smoke coming from the roof. it was not someone who lived there. someone was still living here in the year 2002, 2003. one day, myself and matt black, a photographer who, you know, is kind of a modern day dorothy lang, evans, we pulledded off the side of the road, came over the railroad tracks across this little dirt road here, across from this vineyard, and we pulled up to the shack. it was in better shape then, but a tarp paper shack, and as we walked up, there were rabbit furs that had been -- that were hammered on to the wall. i remember knocking once, twice, and this place was on stilts. the door creeked open, and there stood this black man who looked like he'd been lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s. he had a stutter. in fact, later he told us that he came west with a stutter, one state at a time. his name was james dixon, 95, he was living here and had since the 40s. he was part of the migration of blacks who did something that no blacks in ameri
for the kennedy justice department. in 1963 in mississippi, john stepped between angry protesters and armed police to prevent a potential massacre after the murder of medgar evers. that was the kind of lawyer and later he was. years later he gave me a photo. our nation's greatness is not a birthright, it must be earned by every generation and i am confident that we can earn it for this time.
fell in areas. gulfport, mississippi, was swamped. flooding forced the first day of school in washington county, florida, to be canceled. san diego mayor bob fillner is expected back at city hall to. he has been out of sight since announcing in july that he would seek therapy cunce announcing in july him of sexual harassment. as carter evans reports, fillner now faces a fight to keep his job. >> hey hey, ho, ho. he has got to go. >> the drive to recall san sand-- san diego mayor bob filner is officially under way. >> our petitions for recall are here. >> on the eve of his return to the city hall. >> what is it going to be like in the workplace when the mayor is back in the hallways? >> it's going to be awkward, and there's going to be some tension. >> reporter: city attorney jan goldsmith says the mayor cannot undo the damage he's already done. and he gave this warning to filner when he does return, behave or else. >> we're to the going to just sit back and let him have the run of city hall without having some protections for our employees. that's our obligation. >> reporte
en mississippi muchos han quedado atrapado en las inundaciones causada por fuertes lluvias, el wa agua dejo ba radio los vehÍculos. y los ocupantes tuvieron que abrirse paso en las calles para escapar la inundaciÓn. y lo peor, escuche bien, que seguirÁ lloviendo. mientras, al otro extremo en este lado de la costa oeste. hemos estado con temperaturas casi bordeando el rango de los 80 grados. por el momento vientos leves, del oeste suroeste a razÓn de 10 millas por hospital? y el sur del paÍs, san antonio, en dallas en el centro del paÍs, experimentando temperaturas en los 90 grados y a pesar que ustedes en chicago, desde chicago hasta new york, estuvieron sintiendo temperaturas agradables. todo esto seÑores, va a ser cosa del pasado, nuevamente viene una ola de calor que se estarÁ sintiendo a mitad de semana. y rÁpidamente vamos a territorio mexicano, en ciudad mÉxico, 22 centÍgrados. durango 27 centÍgrados y ustedes inician las temperaturas cÁlidas. en el atlÁntico gracias a dios cruzando los dedos, todo tranquilo, no es el caso en el sureste, como les comentÉ y mos
with a dollop of daisy. ♪ do a dollop of daisy >>> take a look at the scene in gulfport, mississippi. a storm hit during a church service. and so much rain fell so fast, that worshipers became stranded inside of their church. about six inches of rain fell in about two hours. the only time the flooding there was worse was during hurricane katrina. >> and wearing the sunday best. >>> all right. let's take a look at the road conditions. it will be wet along the gulf coast and in the southeast again today. flooding is possible there once again. and rain also could make things difficult for parts of the southwest and the rockies. >> staying in the southwest. if you're flying, it won't be any surprise there will be some delays there. also in the southeast, in atlanta, charlotte and new orleans. >>> new details this morning of a fiery incident on a los angeles freeway that involved actor dick van dyke. >> home video shows the 87-year-old actor's late model jaguar charred after it somehow caught fire and then exploded. abc's gio benitez has the story. >> "the dick van dyke show." >> reporter: he's th
much water. flood warnings are posted from florida to the carolinas. mississippi is trying to dry out after getting drenched with six inches of rain on sunday. in hard-hit gulfport, members of one church were stranded for hours. some say the flooding was worse than hurricane katrina. meteorologist craig setzer tells us whether there's going to be a break in these dangerous conditions. >> much of the region has seen one extreme of weather to the area. parts too wet. parts too dry. the reason, the jet stream taking a very unusually large dip through eastern parts of the country that's causing rain in the southeast and dry conditions in the west. this type of pattern usually doesn't move a whole lot. more hot and dry weather expected in the northern rockies and the pacific northwest. so know relief for the wildfires there. and moisture continues to come up out of the caribbean and gulf of mexico. flooding is once again possible for parts of florida, as well as georgia, alabama and on to the carolinas. now because the pattern is so large in amplitude, big ridges and big dips in the jet st
orleans, pascagula and gulf port, mississippi. we thought we had dodged the bullet and then the levies broke and who would have predicted that there was a sea of humanity in the super dome that basically was in extreme miss? who would have predicted in this day and age we would lose many, many people based on the fact they couldn't be medevacked, that the hospitals themselves had been flooded and the hospital staff was having to carry critically ill patients up to the top floors to avoid the water that was filling in the rooms. who would have predicted that? and were we set up to handle that? and who would have predicted in the early goings there would be civic disorder and civic disobedience and lack of command and control and then the military came there and provided that stability for a while until the civic authorities took over and eventually got things moving in a fairly organized continuum. we learned a tremendous amount of lessons from that, lessons that i hope no other city will ever have to repeat again. but the bottom line is it is so critical at this point to talk about
will not be satisfied as long as the negro in mississippi cannot vote, and the negro in new york believes he has nothing for which to vote. [applause] >> there was no way to know then that it would have the impact that it has had. there was no way we knew he would live long enough to see a black president. >> i cried because it never occurred to me that i would live along enough to see a black man as president of the united states. >> for a black man in this society there was always a need to be cautious about the way you presented yourself in public because you could end up like trayvon. i think dr. king let us understand that you still have to take the risk. i love being a black man in america because it means that there is still hope that things can be changed without mowing down thousands of citizen the way it's happening in other parts of the world. >> it still hurts when other people don't think of you as an american. you're a black american, which means you're an american. if the rest of the country never sees us as americans we'll be struggling with the third march, the tenth march, the 15th mar
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